CIPR adds new csuite podcast episodes to its CPD programme for 2019

We are thrilled to confirm that for the third year running, the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) has added more csuite podcast episodes to it Continuing Professional Development programme (CPD).
The CIPR states that CPD puts its members in the driving seat of their own career, gaining the knowledge and skills they need to progress.
Over 2000 of the CIPR’s members take part in CPD, which is the only route for them to become a Chartered PR Practitioner.
Eleven episodes of our csuite podcast series, that we produced over the last twelve months, have been added to the programme, meaning that those CIPR members taking part in CPD will receive 5 CPD points for listening to each podcast if they log it at their My CPD.
The episodes added to the programme are:

The Internet of Things
Produced in partnership with the European PR agency Tyto, in this episode, we discuss their Hype Report on the Internet of Things, hearing from a number of experts who contributed to it. Featuring:
Practical Futurist, Andrew GrillAbraham Joseph, Founder of IOT insightsStephanie Atkinson, CEO of Compass IntelligenceDan Yarmoluk, Director of Business Development for IoT and Data Science at ATEK Access TechnologiesRich Rogers, Senior Vice President for IoT Product & Engineering at Hitachi Vantara (at the time of recording); Tyto’s Managing Partner Brendon Craigie
 
 
 



Mental Health & Wellbeing in the Workplace – Mad World Forum
Recorded at Mad World, and produced in partnership with Nuffield Health, our guests were:
Sir Ian Cheshire, Chair of Barclays UK and Campaign Chair of Heads Together; Professor Dame Carol Black, Principle of Newnham College, Cambridge and Expert Advisor on health and work to the Department of Health and Public Health England; Brendan Street, Nuffield Health’s Professional Head of Emotional Wellbeing; Dr. Shaun Davis, Global Director of Safety, Health, Wellbeing & Sustainability, Royal Mail Group; Jessica Hayes, Head of Talent, McCann Worldgroup; Jack Parsons, CEO, Big Youth Group; Becky Thoseby, Group Head of Wellbeing, Department for Transport; Ian Howarth, HR Specialist in Wellbeing at Fujitsu; Dr Judith Grant, Director of Health & Wellbeing, Mace
 
 


World Travel Market
Recorded at the World Travel Market, 2018, we partnered up with some of the exhibitors and delegates to get a flavour of what was being discussed at the event. Our guests were:
Mark McVay, Chairman, UKinbound; Dr. Kevin Ashbridge, VP for Global Travel & Leisure Solutions, SDL; Hon. Edmund Bartlett, Minister of Tourism, Jamaica Tourist Board; Richard Fraiman, Chief Executive, Good Hotel Guide; José Luis Egas Ramirez, Undersecretary of Markets, Investments and International Relations, Ministry of Tourism of Ecuador
 
 
 


Behavioural Finance
Recorded in partnership with CFA UK from their conference in London on the topic of ‘Behavioural Finance in the age of algorithms’, we interviewed the five speakers from the event. Our guests were:
1. Markus Schuller, Founder and Managing Partner of Panthera Solutions
2. Philippa Clough, Portfolio Manager at JP Morgan Asset Management International Equity Group
3. Kristina Vasileva, Senior Lecturer in Finance at Westminster Business School
4. Shweta Agarwal, a member of BlackRock’s Risk & Quantitative Analysis Group
5. Magda Osman, a Reader in Experimental Cognitive Psychology at Queen Mary University of London
 
 
 


Social Mobility
Produced in partnership with the UK’s Ministry of Justice, to coincide with Social Mobility Live, our guests were:
Shaun McNally CBE, Chief Executive, Legal Aid Agency and Social Mobility Champion at the Ministry of Justice;
Jenny Baskerville, Co-Head of Inclusion, Diversity and Social Equality, KPMG; Nicholas Cheffings, Partner and Past Chair, Hogan Lovells and Chair of PRIME
 
 
 
 



How Connected Brands Drive Growth
The latest FutureBrand Index highlighted how the most future proofed companies consistently align the totality of the experiences they create with their wider corporate purpose and that was the focus of this episode, which was produced in partnership with FutureBrandand featured:
Kerry O’Callaghan, VP for Global Brand at GSK; Jeremy Waite, Chief Strategy Officer at IBM; Jon Tipple, FutureBrand’s Worldwide Chief Strategy Officer
 
 
 


VC and Female Founders Report
Produced in partnership with British Business BankDiversity VC and British Private Equity and Venture Capital Association (BVCA) to coincide with the release of a new report from all three organisations, commissioned by HM Treasury, which highlights the fact that female start-up founders are missing out on billions of pounds of investment.  Our guests were:
Alice Hu Wagner, Managing Director for Strategy and Economics, British Business Bank; Francesca Warner, CEO and Co-Founder of Diversity VC; David Mott, Chair of the BVCA’s Venture Capital Committee and Founder Partner, Oxford Capital
 
 


How To Create Award-Winning Corporate Content
Produced in partnership with CFA Society of the UK and recorded at their Professionalism Conference, this episode features some great interviews, including:
Produced in partnership with Communicate Magazine, where we spoke to two of the winners of their Corporate Content Awards.  Our guests were:
Brittany Golob, Communicate’s Publishing Editor; Dagmar Mackett, Director of Film, Video and Motion, DRPG;
David Boardman, Director of Communications and Engagement, MyCSP
 
 
 


Fintech Interactive Forum
Recorded in partnership with CFA UK from their Fintech Interactive Forum, ‘Asset management: Rise of the machines’, our guests included:
Mikey Shulman, Head of Machine Learning, Kensho; Vinay Jayaram, CEO and co-founder of Envizage; Julie Chakraverty, CEO and founder of Rungway; Yasin Rosowsky, Head of AI Research at Arabesque; Clare Flynn Levy, Founder and CEO, Essentia Analytics; Tim Grant CEO, DrumG Technologies; Geoff Kates, CEO, HTF Group
 
 
 


How Businesses Are Innovating For Long-Term Success
Produced in partnership with FutureBrand to coincided with the launch of TerraCycle’s groundbreaking LOOP initiative in North America our guests were:
Jon Tipple, FutureBrand’s Worldwide Chief Strategy Officer and Laure Cucuron, General Manager of TerraCycle
 
 
 
 
 


FutureBrand Country Index
Produced in partnership with FutureBrand to discuss the launch of their latest FutureBrand Country Index.
Ben Bland hosted the show and was joined by Jon Tipple, Global Chief Strategy Officer, FutureBrand; Rowan Williams, Creative Lead, Panasonic Design London, with contribution from Conrad Bird, Director of the Great Britain campaign at the Department of International Trade
 
 
 
 


All previous shows of the csuite podcast series are available at csuitepodcast.com as all podcast apps – search ‘the csuite podcast’.
There is also a growing community on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter, where you can get involved in the discussion.
Finally, if you subscribe to the show, please do give it a positive rating and review on iTunes in particular as this helps it up the charts!

CIPR adds new csuite podcast episodes to its Summer of CPD programme

We are thrilled to confirm that for the second year running, the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) has added a number of our csuite podcast episodes to it Continuing Professional Development programme (CPD).
The CIPR states that CPD puts its members in the driving seat of their own career, gaining the knowledge and skills they need to progress.
Over 2000 of the CIPR’s members take part in CPD, which is the only route for them to become a Chartered PR Practitioner.
Eight of the podcasts that we produced over the last twelve months have been added to the programme, meaning that those CIPR members taking part in CPD will receive 5 CPD points for listening to each podcast if they log it at their My CPD.
Koray Camgoz, Public Relations Manager, CIPR said: “The csuite podcast has a earned a reputation for its thought provoking content and cutting edge analysis of industry issues. We’re thrilled to be able to share these podcasts with our members as part of our Summer of CPD campaign. The summer is the perfect time to take stock of your professional goals and learn about developing areas of practice. These podcasts provide members with an excellent opportunity to do that.”
The episodes added to the programme are:
Driving Cultural Transformation
The first of three special episodes recorded in partnership with Microsoft from their Future Decoded event in ExCeL, London and featuring:
Clare Barclay, COO Microsoft UK
Ian McLaren, Finance and Contracts Director at London Midland
Hector Minto, Microsoft’s Accessibility Evangelist for EMEA
Andrew Cook, Microsoft’s Senior Product Marketing Manager for Firstline
Patience Wootton of Dentsu Aegis Network
 
 



UK Tech Influencers – Top 500 Power List
Recorded in partnership with Tyto to discuss the launch of their ‘Tyto Tech 500 Power List‘, which consists of the top 500 Technology influencers in the UK. Guests in the studio were:
Ellen Raphael, Head of Insight, Tyto
Brendon Craigie, Managing Partner, Tyto
Dr Sue Black OBE, Technology Evangelist and UK Government Advisor on Digital Services
Jeremy Waite, IBM’s Global Leader of CMO Programs
Plus we also hear from Anne Boden, CEO of Starling Bank
 
 


Readying business for the big data revolution 
Produced in partnership with the Association of International Certified Professional Accountants, we were joined by:
The Association’s, Associate Technical Director, Peter Simons
Simon Jeffery, Group Manager for Technology & Management Information Systems at Siem Car Carriers.
 
 
 
 
 



The Content State Of Mind – Attitudes to Branded Content  
James Erskine, Managing Director of The Big Shot discusses the findings of his agency’s latest research into consumer attitudes to branded content.
He was also joined by Hannah Bourne, Marketing Director Children’s at Penguin Random House UK who talks about working with online influencers.
 
 
 
 



How To Create Award-Winning Corporate Content
We speak to some of the winners from Communicate Magazines’s 2018 Corporate Content Awards. In the studio were:
Amaris Cole, Digital Communications and Content Manager at the Church of England
Tim Turner, Content Director at content marketing agency, Wardour
Andrew Thomas, Founder of Cravenhill Publishing, the publishers of Communicate magazine and the organisers of the Corporate Content Awards.
We also hear from Nathanael Moyers, Head of UK Corporate Communications at Arcadis and Ashish Babu the Chief Marketing and Communications Officer for Tata Consultancy Services in Europe and the UK.
 



Wellbeing in the Workplace
Sponsored by Nuffield Health and recorded at the Endeavour Search & Selection Wellbeing Seminar, we spoke with a number of the morning’s presenters, including:
Geoff McDonald, former Global VP for HR at Unilever, who talked about the need for companies to embed purpose as a driver of their business performance and why it’s so important for people to talk about their mental health
Alaana Linney, [at the time] Director of Business Development, Nuffield Health on their holistic approach to health and wellbeing and understanding data
Monica Kalia, Co-founder, Neyber on financial wellbeing.
Alan Fogarty, Partner at Cundall on how a building can impact on the wellness of those working within it.
Holly Price, Training & Development Director, Keltbray Group & Daniel Raine, Global Director Consulting & Business Intelligence, HRG Worldwide shared their company’s wellbeing journeys.
Kirsten Samuel, CEO of Kamwell on implementing wellbeing programmes



The Investment Professional of the Future
Produced in partnership with CFA Society of the UK and recorded at their Professionalism Conference, this episode features some great interviews, including:
Dame Helena Morrissey, Head of Personal Investing at Legal & General Investment Management on Trust and Diversity
Jeremy White, Executive Editor of Wired, on AI, Blockchain and Facebook
Ben Page, Chief Executive of Ipsos MORI on ‘Trust and the State of Britain in 2018’
Gary Baker, CFA Institute’s Managing Director EMEA and Gerry Fowler, Chairman, CFA Society of the UK discuss expectations of a Professional, Ethics and Value
Patrick Hudson, Professor Emeritus in The Human Factor in Safety at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands on ‘How High-Hazard Industries Manage Safety’
James Parsons, Leadership coach at Untapped Talent on ‘The Hidden Drivers of Ethical Behaviour’



Business & Government Partnerships
Produced in partnership with the Cabinet Office, in this episode we discussed how the work being carried by its Business Partnerships team, is building successful, long-term partnerships between business and government to deliver the voice of business into policy development and transformation, with the main aim of tackling the UK’s biggest social and economic challenges. Our guests in the studio were:
Shevaun Haviland, Deputy Director for Business Partnerships at the Prime Minister’s Office and Cabinet Office
Ann Pickering, CHRO and Chief of Staff at Telefónica UK (O2 in the UK)
Caroline Mason CBE, the Chief Executive Officer of the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation and Co-Chair of the Inclusive Economy Partnership
 
 


All previous shows of the csuite podcast series are available at csuitepodcast.com as well as SoundcloudiTunesTuneInacast, Google Podcasts and Stitcher.
There is also a growing community on Facebook and Twitter, where you can get involved in the discussion.
Finally, if you subscribe to the show, please do give it a positive rating and review on iTunes in particular as this helps it up the charts!

Virtual Wake Up Call – Genning up on Virtual Reality Video

Earlier this week I attended PR360 and have come away truly inspired thanks to the team from Hotwire who were in the networking area showing off Virtual Reality technology.  They had a VR headset on their stand, and were giving delegates the opportunity to try it out by watching the Clouds Over Sidra film that was produced last year for the United Nations.
I grabbed the opportunity to try out the technology whilst John Brown, Hotwire’s Director, Head of Engagement talked me through it.
It was the first time I’d ever experienced VR and all I can say is ‘wow’!  It really is hard to describe what it’s like, but if you watch Mike Butcher’s reactions in the video of him trying it out whilst interviewing the producer of the film, Socrates Kakoulides, for Techcrunch, you’ll see how easy it is to get lost in the VR world and wrapped up in the emotion of that film in particular. [Download VRSE‘s app to view the film.]
Seeing this film and chatting to Emma Hazan, Hotwire’s Deputy UK MD (and previous guest on show 4 of my csuitepodcast series) has really inspired me to gen up on this area of video.  Embarrassingly, I don’t even refer to VR in the ‘Using Video in Social Media’ workshop I regularly run for the PRCA and other clients – this will now change by the time I host my next session!
I feel I have a bit of catching up to do on this topic, but have been truly inspired by what I’ve seen.
Emma talked to me about how VR is perfect for the travel industry – imagine being able to walk around your hotel, look at the bar area, the pool, and check out your room before you book.  We then chatted about other industries that could benefit, and of course, whilst agreeing that the Porn industry would no doubt lead the way, how about the Property market, especially high end sales for overseas investors.  No need to visit the £1m+ apartments, just look around with your VR headset and then send your deposit – deal done!
This is my new favourite topic and so if anyone has some good case studies they want to share with me to include in my future workshops, please do get in touch.

Communication let me down

[an edited version of this post was first published on PRMoment.com]
If you’re looking to expand your business internationally, or are working for clients that already trade outside the UK, then you might want to pay attention to a new report that shows that British businesses are losing out because they have a lack of language skills and cultural awareness within their organisations.
The report is the result of work that I carried out for translation and localisation agency Conversis, since writing my post on the importance of getting the language right in international PR campaigns back in April.
Within that blog post, I referred to the fact that in the lead up to the General Election, the word ‘language’ appeared just once in the Conservative Party manifesto and not at all in Labour’s, this despite the fact that Baroness Coussins, chair of the APPG for Modern Languages, had previously said that the UK economy was losing around £50 billion a year in lost contracts because of lack of language skills in the workforce.
Conversis therefore wanted to look into the importance that the c-suites of UK businesses, that are currently or looking to operate internationally, put on Cultural Awareness within their organisations, together with the impact the current state of play has on enhancing their performance and competitiveness.
What we weren’t expecting though, was quite how much of an impact the lack of these skills were having on their trading opportunities.

One in four companies in the UK that currently, or are looking to, operate internationally said they had lost business opportunities because of a lack of foreign language skills, with two in five saying a lack of cultural understanding among their newest employees has resulted in the same.
Two thirds of senior UK directors at those businesses are worried that many young adults’ perspectives or educational experiences are not broad enough to operate in a multicultural economy.
With my own daughter starting university just last week, I was pleased to hear that she was considering chosing an additional language option with her course, especially as the research found that two thirds of respondents to the survey look for new college hires and graduates with first language competency other than English that can connect them to new markets. A similar number values those with the ability to speak other languages that are critical for their business’ economic growth and this percentage is also the case for those that say they would hire multilingual candidates over those who lack a second language. 61.5% also said they give an advantage to candidates with international experience and 64% to those with multicultural experience.
Gary Muddyman, CEO of Conversis, said “I believe the recent push to promote STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) subjects at school should be changed to STEM-L, to include languages too. The global economy and the Internet have changed the expectation of consumers across the world and we are now in a period of transition. The UK is falling behind the trend which will ultimately lead to a lack of competitiveness. Consumers are ten times more likely to buy goods or services if addressed in their own language, irrespective of their own linguistic skills. If we are not addressing our overseas customers in their own tongue we reduce the likelihood that they will buy from us.”
Glen Richardson the CMO of Fruugo.com, a global marketplace selling 1.3m products in 33 countries, added “Fruugo.com exists because consumers want to buy products from retailers around the world and the majority of retailers don’t have either the technology, skills or knowledge in-house to fulfil global demand. Not only are there language, currency and payment barriers to overcome but also the cultural marketing know-how to attract and convert shoppers to buy. We solve these issues technologically as well as employing foreign staff with the appropriate skills and languages to service both shoppers and retailers in foreign countries.”
As I wrote in that previous post, getting the language right when communicating internationally can make a huge difference to the success of your PR campaign.  That said, I don’t even understand the lyrics of Spandau Ballet’s 1983 classic ‘Communication’, and they were written in English!

The ‘Importance of global talent within international businesses’ report can be downloaded for free from Conversis.com

The importance of getting the language right in international PR campaigns

Last month I had the pleasure of attending the Globalization and Localization Association’s (GALA) annual conference – the leading event for the language industry. Whilst this meant having to fly out on my birthday, it did mean I got to celebrate in the beautiful city of Seville and had the opportunity to be a true geek and get a photo at a Star Wars film location, whilst wearing my Star Wars t-shirt!
I should say that I did manage to squeeze in some proper culture by also visiting the tomb of Christopher Columbus in Seville Cathedral
There were over 400 attendees at GALA representing Language Service Providers from all over the world, most of whom spoke numerous languages, but all perfectly versed in English.  And then there was me, whose linguistic talents comprise of a ‘B’ in my French O’Level (that’s like a GSCE for younger readers) and the ability to order a ‘large beer’ in German.  It was quite an embarrassing situation to be in, but probably typical of many Brits abroad.
Last July, the APPG for Modern Languages published its Manifesto for Languages calling for all political parties to make a general election manifesto commitment to improve the UK’s linguistic skills base. At the time, Baroness Coussins, Chair of that particular APPG, said that the UK economy was losing around £50 billion a year in lost contracts because of lack of language skills in the workforce.
Given the timing of this blog, I decided to do a quick search for the word ‘language’ in the Labour and Conservative party manifestos.  In terms of our kids’ education, the only reference the Tories made was stating that they will require secondary school pupils to take a GSCE in a language.  However, the word didn’t even appear in Labour’s document at all.
It’s no surprise therefore, to hear many examples that show a naivety around the importance of language in the English-speaking PR industries both here in the UK and in the US, given the global nature of communications and our ability to access information instantly from anywhere in the world.
Getting the language right when communicating internationally can make a huge difference to the success of your PR campaign.  After all, according to Common Sense Advisory, 85% of international consumers prefer native language webpages when researching prepurchase, which impacts your SEO strategy too.
There are a number of challenges faced by PRs when planning an international campaign.  Gary Muddyman, CEO of translation agency Conversis, puts linguistic and cultural challenges at the top of his list and says that ‘literal translation is often not enough,’ and that ‘we need to engage the international audience in a way the source copy does for your domestic market.’  Gary believes that the influence of local resources with local knowledge is vital.
This is probably best summed up by a recent experience that, Karolina Davison shared with me. Karolina is a London-based PR Consultant who has worked with me on a few projects over the last 6 months. She describes herself as having one foot in the UK and the other in Scandinavia – she’s Swedish, but has lived and worked in the US for many years as well.  Recently, a client with a significant global presence asked her to translate and distribute a press release to the Swedish media. Instructions from the US HQ were simple and non-negotiable: ‘Translate, but do not change the legally-approved content in any way.’  However, since the press release was a corporate announcement and not specific to the Nordics, Karolina said she soon realised that her odds of securing coverage would be limited if she wasn’t able to rewrite it.  Her view is that ‘translation can be a wasted exercise if not combined with localisation’. In Karolina’s experience from working in the US, it is completely acceptable to use poetic adjectives to describe a company’s mission and the habits of its clients. However, in Sweden, she said that you stay close to the facts and refrain from using ‘flowery’ words or ‘lofty’ exaggerations. When American consumers are ‘passionate’ about a product, Swedes are ‘appreciative’, even though the direct Swedish translation would be ‘passionerade.’  She therefore believes that it comes down to adhering to cultural subtleties and argues that ‘it is not uncommon for entire company descriptions, i.e. ‘boiler plates’, to need a complete make-over in order to make sense and be taken seriously in a foreign country.’
Heidi Lorenzen of translation software provider Cloudworks summed up localisation in a blog I read whilst researching for this post.  She wrote that it goes well beyond word-for-word translation and takes into account the nuances of regional audiences and customs to get the tone, phrases, and even images correct so that materials read naturally in each target audience’s own language, and do not convey unintended messages. Research and knowledge of your target market may reveal cultural differences and beliefs that can have a big impact on how marketing messages are perceived.’
This aligns with Gary Muddyman’s view that ‘competent translation is just the starting point’.  His second challenge for International PRs is that of the tightly-controlled brand, managed centrally, versus local influence and adaptation.
The issue of local nuances and cultures is perfectly summed up by a case study that Jon Meakin, International PR Director of Grayling shared with me.  Jon’s view is that ‘The challenges of understanding and adapting to cultural nuances are even greater than that of language.’ Last year Grayling ran a pan-European Christmas campaign for a global client with a US HQ, which he feels illustrates this perfectly. Jon said that ‘Churchill described Britain and Americas as ‘two nations divided by a common language’ and the first issue was our US client’s insistence on referring to the Christmas period as the Holiday season. That and an assumption that ‘Europe’ is a homogenous entity, rather than a federation of 50 or so separate countries. While there are undoubtedly similarities between European nations – and we were able to identify five or six Christmas shopper archetypes that apply almost universally – there are many differences, and when you start to explore the different ways in which Christmas is celebrated you quickly realise that a template approach just won’t work.’
To make his point, Jon uses the example that in Spain, gifts are not exchanged until Twelfth Night and that the same is true of Russia, although not all of Russia. He says that ‘it’s wonderfully complex’ and stresses that the key lesson is to ‘resist the temptation to ‘command and control’’.
Whilst he agrees to set a framework, Jon believes that if you follow his advice and ‘allow individual markets the freedom to move within the parameters you set’, you will ‘celebrate the differences and reap the rewards.’
This concept of the English and Americans sharing a ‘common language’ was highlighted in Curzon PR’s recent blog post following the opening of their New York office, highlighting small differences in spelling such as ‘colour’ and ‘color’, or that whole sectors of the [PR] industry go by different names in these two countries, with ‘food and drink PR’ known as ‘food and beverage PR’ in the USA.
I thought I’d stress the point further by coming up with two versions of the same (rather silly) sentence, both written in ‘English’:

‘The sidewalk outside the drugstore, on the opposite side of the cross walk from the gas station was covered in trash that had fallen out of the dumpster.  There was an old soccer ball, used diaper, a ripped pair of pants, and some half eaten cookies.’

or

‘The pavement outside the chemist, on the opposite side of the zebra crossing from the petrol station was covered in rubbish that had fallen out of the skip.  There was an old football, used nappy, a ripped pair of trousers and some half eaten biscuits.’

Karolina probably puts it better than me though by stating that ‘You don’t have to be bilingual to be faced with a localisation dilemma. Any English-speaking person who has worked with an American client knows that US-produced content often needs to be modified to suit the UK market. Sometimes it takes a lot more than just changing the z’s to s’s for the key messages to make sense. The more culturally distinct the country is from the territory where the copy originated, the more work it will require.’ In the case of her US client looking for coverage in Sweden, she ended up writing a pitch to make up for the cultural shortcomings of the press release she was provided and to spend more time than usual selling it in over the phone. She said that the end-result was ‘decent’ but not nearly as good as it could have been had she been allowed to rework the copy. The experience furthered her belief that ‘brands should be bold and invest the extra cost up front to make sure that their collateral is appropriately localised before sharing it globally,’ also making the point that ‘a misrepresented image of a company in the media can do more harm than good.’
A further challenge highlighted by Gary Muddyman is that ‘every stage in the communication process available to potential customers needs to be localised.’  For example, he stresses that ‘it’s no use if your website is in a local language, if the telephone contact details leads to a Call Centre where there are no language skills.’
Finally, the last challenge to overcome is when you are trying so hard to make your existing copy work in a different territory, you might be better off going back to the original brief, and simply starting the copywriting process again.  This is when to consider transcreation, which Conversis defines as taking the values, concepts and key messages of the brand, but recreating them in the different markets by perhaps using more culturally relevant examples to ensure that audiences the world over experience the same emotional reactions to your brand.
A version of this blog post was first published on PRMoment.com

Are you linked in or out?

At my most recent CIPR Social Media Panel ‘csuite podcast’ recording, I had the pleasure of welcoming Ketchum’s Stephen Waddington to the studio as one of my guests on the show.
Before we sat down in front of the mic, we got chatting about the pros and cons of LinkedIn, as you do, with me being a fan of the platform and Wadds arguing that it’s just become very noisy and full of spam.
As a result, Wadds asked me to write a guest post for his blog highlighting a few tips on how to get some true value from this particular social network.
Without justifying anything with user stats or how important your personal social media profiles have become in terms of social selling (let’s take it as read that that is the case) here are the ten suggestions I shared for why you should be LinkedIn and not LinkedOut.

  1. Share knowledge

If you blog, you may find you get far more engagement to your posts if you publish them on LinkedIn, and you never know who might end up reading them.  Over Christmas, my family visited Disneyland Paris, and I wrote a post about why I thought the park needed a sprinkle of pixie dust on my return.  The post has been read 490 times to date, but interestingly, it found its way to a number of employees of Disneyland Paris, which led me to now be connected with the company’s Senior CRM manager.  Having discussed this with Wadds, on his birthday last week, he published his first post on the platform – 45 lessons at age 45 – which I’m proud to take some credit for as he commented that he followed his own rule No. 36 after our discussion – ‘Knowledge is power’, which stated ‘Never stop learning and develop an openness and enthusiasm about the world. Curiosity wouldn’t have killed the cat if it had read more books.’   In the space of one weekend, his post had 550 views, 64 likes and 32 comments (Wadds has a little more influence than me!)

  1. Plan your travels

If you are heading anywhere for the day, whether in the UK or further afield, and have time in your diary to fill, search on LinkedIn for the destination you are visiting and see who you know there.  You can do a more detailed search using the ‘Advanced’ search feature and typing in the post code or city that you are travelling to.  This does rely on whether users type in their home postcode or work post code when they first register of course, and often (myself included) may forget to update it when they move jobs.

  1. Reconnect

In the 20+ years I’ve been working since graduating, I’ve picked up just a few business cards and every now and then, I do a cull of the ones I’ve not been in contact with for years, or can’t even remember where I met them.  But not before I do a quick search on LinkedIn to see where they are now and so try to reconnect with them if relevant.

  1. Welcome visitors

Look under your Profile tab to see who is viewing your profile? There could be a whole bunch of reasons for people visiting your LinkedIn page, including some going to the wrong person with the same name of course, but wouldn’t it be good to know why?  Send them a note, thank them for stopping by and ask how you can help.

  1. Don’t be afraid to network

That doesn’t mean spam people. The LinkedIn mobile app doesn’t currently allow you to personalise invites, so I only ever send them via my desktop, using the ‘Personalise invitation’ option, as that way I can introduce myself and give a summary of why I want to connect.  There is nothing more frustrating than getting an invite, accepting it, and then getting hit by a standard sales email.

  1. Say who you are.  

I hate the fact that when I look to see who has viewed my profile, I see the following:
linekdin
The clue to getting the best out of Social Network like LinkedIn are in those two key words, i.e. being  sociable and using it to network.  You wouldn’t go up to someone in the real world at a conference, for example, ask them to explain who they are, but not introduce yourself, so why do it here?  What do you have to hide, even if you are a competitor?

  1. Join Groups

This, again, is a great way to find new people to connect with.  I am off to an industry conference in Seville this month, and so have joined the specific organisation’s group to start my networking early and see if I can set up meetings during the breaks at the conference. Being in a group also helps when you send out invites as it gives you more reason to connect with someone new, again enabling you to personalise invite further by saying you share x many connections and y number of groups, so you obviously have quite a bit in common.

  1. Give feedback

I’ll admit that I don’t tend to read many of the updates that appear in my home page stream – I often browse through the top few when I go on the site but that’s all – with over 2000 contacts, it’s impossible to read everything.  But if you’ve connected with likeminded individuals in a similar field to yours, then the chances are a lot of the updates will be relevant to your work, so it’s worth scrolling through every now and then and picking out the odd article to read that has been shared that catches your eye.  Similarly, if someone has taken the trouble to publish a post, and you liked it, or had something to add, tell them and share it too (feel free to do both to this).

  1. Keep your profile updated

Many people see LinkedIn as a dynamic CV to help find their next job and don’t appreciate that people/companies may be using it to seek you out for your expertise in your current role.  So keep your profile updated.  Let people know what you’ve been up to and what you do for a living.  Share your expertise by embedding your presentations from Slideshare, or if, like me, you record podcasts, you can embed those from Soundcloud.

  1. It’s not Facebook

And finally, just a polite reminder, this is a business social network, not a personal one.  Whilst I was flattered that 0.35% (8 people) of my LinkedIn network liked my new photo when I updated my profile recently, I also found it a little strange, but perhaps that’s just me.  Thanks all the same though!
 
There are lots more tips and ways to benefit from LinkedIn and these were just the first few that came to mind.  Of course, if you want to find out more, you can always connect with me and ask – I’m at uk.linkedin.com/in/russellgoldsmith

CPD Done!

Back in August last year I decided to stand for the CIPR Council elections and through that process I realised that in all the time I had been a member, I had never been questioned about what I do for my Continuing Professional Development (CPD), something I now believe every member should have to commit to.
The topic of ‘Professionalism’ was highlighted by Stephen Waddington.  As one of his 10 pledges when he was CIPR President in 2014, he stated that we need to ‘Recognise that the public relations industry must shift from a craft to a profession by putting Continuing Professional Development (CPD) at its core’, and therefore he wanted to ‘Set a roadmap to ensure that CPD is recognised and seen as a key CIPR member benefit’.
In his Handover report in Q4 (see slide 4), Wadds talked about how work is now underway on scoping the development of an enhanced CPD offer for mid-career and senior practitioners. He confirmed that CPD completion rates in the 2014 to 2015 cycle have continued to increase year-on-year and that increasing this number will be a key focus for 2015.
Whilst I didn’t win my seat on the Council, I have seen through my commitment to complete my CPD this year.  It was easy, provided me with a bit of needed focus, was educational and surprisingly, it was actually quite enjoyable.
Inspired by Stuart Bruce’s blog post over the weekend, I’m sharing my CPD report below:
cpdreport
I’ve actually been lazy in that I haven’t recorded anything like the number of CPD activities I’ve attended, downloaded, read, watched or been involved in myself in terms of supporting others.  I intend to improve this next year to ensure I keep a note of more than is required just to reach my 60 points.  However, having finally gotten involved, I do believe the system needs improving.  60 points isn’t a hard total to reach, especially as two thirds of that was achieved through my participation on the CIPR’s Social Media Panel (CIPRSM), and attending and presenting at the Festival of Marketing.  I also claimed an easy 5 points by listing the csuite Podcast series that I produce.  So in effect, the main bulk of my points are in me providing support, although to be fair, I’ve actually found this is the best way I learn new things too.  For example, the Festival of Marketing had a really high quality of delegates and the presentations that I managed to sit in on whilst there were excellent, especially the one by my fellow CIPRSM member Dom Burch who discussed how Asda have engaged with YouTubers for their Mum’s Eye View YouTube channel (this was a good review of it on Econsultancy).   Another great presentation was by Philip Byrne, creative director at Buzzfeed who talked about shareable content (again, another good review here on Econsultancy)
Similarly, being an active member of the CIPRSM has enabled me to meet some inspiring minds in our industry and I always come away from those meetings enthused and full of new ideas and I encourage members to get actively involved in other panels that are of interest to them, plus I won’t lie in that by doing so helps your business development as well as personal development too.  Finally, producing the Podcast series gives me access to some great guests.  I have committed to write up each interview as a blog post too and I can honestly say I have taken away some great learnings from each of the interviews I have carried out so far.
But I do feel that improvements can be made to the CPD process.  It will be interesting to see how many people, like me, are frantically completing their report this week ahead of the deadline – nothing changes really, from doing your homework on the bus, to calling your accountant on the last day that you can submit your tax returns!
So perhaps we need to encourage better participation and learning throughout the year.  Maybe there needs to be a monthly or quarterly target to reach, plus a commitment to participate in something from a number of different disciplines or different activities, just to show you have a commitment to learning more about our profession, rather than simply taking an easy route to reaching your target points.
In the meantime, however, I really do encourage all members to take part.  You can still reach your 60 points this week, even if you haven’t started yet, but if not, at least make a commitment to do so for 2015/16.  You never know, you might learn something!

Privacy Settings
We use cookies to enhance your experience while using our website. If you are using our Services via a browser you can restrict, block or remove cookies through your web browser settings. We also use content and scripts from third parties that may use tracking technologies. You can selectively provide your consent below to allow such third party embeds. For complete information about the cookies we use, data we collect and how we process them, please check our Privacy Policy
Youtube
Consent to display content from Youtube
Vimeo
Consent to display content from Vimeo
Google Maps
Consent to display content from Google